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We’ve Got Upcoming Scrum Webcasts To Share With You As Of January 31st, 2022!

We’ve Got Upcoming Scrum Webcasts To Share With You As Of January 31st, 2022!

Webcasts are an excellent way to gain new insights and knowledge about scrum and agile practices. By watching live presentations or recorded sessions, you can learn from experienced professionals who have a wealth of knowledge to share. Whether you’re new to scrum or have been practicing for years, webcasts can help you stay current on the latest techniques and strategies for optimizing your workflow and improving your overall results.

By attending a webcast, you have the opportunity to interact with the presenter and ask questions. This can help you to clarify any misunderstandings and gain a deeper understanding of the topic being covered. Furthermore, webcasts often provide opportunities for attendees to connect with other professionals in the field, providing a valuable networking opportunity.

In this week’s list of new webcasts, you’ll have the chance to learn about a range of topics that are essential for improving your scrum and agile skills. For example, “How to Improve Communication and Collaboration Between Developers and Scrum Masters” will help you understand how to build stronger relationships between your team members and maximize the efficiency of your workflow. “Ask a Professional Scrum Trainer with PSTs Joanna Plaskonka and Magdalena Kucharska – Answering your Burning Scrum Questions” provides a unique opportunity to ask experienced trainers any questions you may have about scrum and agile practices. Lastly, “Ask a Professional Scrum Trainer with Sander Dur” offers an opportunity to learn from a highly experienced trainer and gain valuable insights into the latest trends and best practices in the field. By watching these webcasts, you’ll be able to further your knowledge and improve your scrum and agile skills, helping you to achieve even greater success in your career.

Upcoming Webcasts

At Scrum.org, we have two webcast series that can help you continue your learning. ScrumPulse is an educational webcast series designed to help those new to Scrum and those with experience learn and improve. We also offer an Ask a Professional Scrum Trainer series, which is a live interactive session where you can bring your toughest Scrum questions and challenges! Below is the listing of the webcasts we have coming up soon!

Tuesday
January 31
11:00 AM EST
(16:00 UTC)

10 Tips to Enable Self-Managing Teams
In this webinar, Professional Scrum Trainer Ravi Verma shares a play from his Scrum Adoption Playbook – the Scrum Team Quick-Launch or Reboot. He shares the 10 common barriers to the emergence of self-managing Scrum Teams and the 10 practices we use to help Scrum Teams break-through these barriers. Learn more
Wednesday
February 8
10:00 AM EST
(15:00 UTC)

How to Improve Communication and Collaboration Between Developers and Scrum Masters
Scrum is a tool that helps people, teams and organizations generate value through adaptive solutions to complex problems. In this Scrum Pulse, PSTs Joanna Plaskonka and Magdalena Kucharska will talk about these misconceptions and consider what you can do to make working with Scrum Master better and more effective through communication. Learn more
Tuesday
February 14
11:00 AM EST
(16:00 UTC)

Ask a Professional Scrum Trainer with Sander Dur
In this live session of Ask a Professional Scrum Trainer, Sander Dur will be available to answer your burning questions about Scrum and the challenges you or your teams have. Learn more
Wednesday
February 15
10:00 AM EST
(15:00 UTC)

German Edition Scrum Pulse: Effektive Kommunikation: Wie nur 3 Facilitation-Methoden die wichtigste Fähigkeit eines Scrum Teams fördern
In diesem Scrum-Pulse-Webcast erklärt Professional Scrum Trainer Simon Flossmann, wie man mit nur 3 einfachen Facilitation-Techniken die Kommunikation in Scrum Teams nachhaltig effektiver gestaltet. Learn more
Thursday
March 16
10:00 AM EDT
(14:00 UTC)

Ask a Professional Scrum Trainer with PSTs Joanna Plaskonka and Magdalena Kucharska – Answering your Burning Scrum Questions
In this live session of Ask a Professional Scrum Trainers, Joanna Plaskonka and Magdalena Kucharska will be available to answer your burning questions about Scrum and the challenges you or your teams have. Read more
Wednesday
March 22
11:00 AM EDT
(15:00 UTC)

Italian edition Scrum Pulse – La Leadership Giusta per Innovare, Il Servant Manager
In questo evento esploreremo come, facendo evolvere il vostro modo di essere, stimolerete l’innovazione, renderete i vostri prodotti migliori e i clienti più contenti.
Speaker: Fabio Panzavolta Read More
The Latest Scrum.Org Posts As Of January 24th, 2023!

The Latest Scrum.Org Posts As Of January 24th, 2023!

Welcome to the latest edition of our blog series, “The Latest Blogs from Scrum.org”! Here at Scrum.org, we believe that learning and growth are essential for individuals and teams to thrive in today’s fast-paced business environment. That’s why we are proud to feature the insights and experiences of our Professional Scrum Trainers through a variety of blogs on our website.

Each month, we send out this email to highlight some of the most recent and thought-provoking blogs from our Professional Scrum Trainers. These experienced professionals have a wealth of knowledge and expertise to share, and their blogs cover a wide range of topics related to Scrum and agile methodologies. From tips and tricks for implementing Scrum in your organization, to reflections on the challenges and successes of real-world Scrum implementations, there’s something for everyone to learn and grow from.

Whether you’re new to Scrum or have been working with it for years, our Professional Scrum Trainers’ blogs offer valuable insights and practical advice for anyone looking to improve their understanding and application of Scrum. So, take a moment to browse through the latest blogs from Scrum.org and see how our Professional Scrum Trainers can help you and your team take your Scrum practice to the next level.


The Latest Blogs from Scrum.org

Learning from Scrum.org Professional Scrum Trainers

Scrum.org Professional Scrum Trainers share their knowledge and experiences in blogs to help people and teams learn and grow.  This email comes out monthly to highlight some of the most recently released blogs.

​​​​​- How to Facilitate Difficult Scrum Team Conversations
– 7 Tips for Setting More Effective Goals

 

 


– [VLOG] 7 Reasons Values Die In “Transformation”
– [VLOG] How To Stop Wasting Your Agile “Transformation” Budget

 

 


How can Product Owners get Maximum Value from Scrum?

 

 

 


 [VLOG] Who Should Be The Product Owner….
 [VLOG] How to Start Scrum for Enterprise Transformation

 

 


– Experiment: Take The First Steps To Automate Integration & Deployment
– Experiment: Limit The Maximum Length Of Your Product Backlog

 

 


– You are a Creation Machine – Professional Mind series (#1)
– Every Scrum Team Works on a Vibration – Professional Mind Series (#2)

 

 


– The Importance of Transparency during the Sprint Retrospective (04)
– The Importance of Transparency during the entire Sprint (05)

 

 


The Purpose of a Goal is Not to Reach It

 

 

​​​​​


– The Surprising Benefits of Pair Programming for Software Teams
– When Stakeholders Bypass the Product Owner

 

 


– A ChatGPT Job Interview for a Scrum Master Position
– Unlock the Power of ChatGPT for your Scrum Team

 

 


Agile Principles – Sustainable Pace

 

 

 


 Self Managing Defects Escaping into Prod

 

 

 



–  Exploring the Differences Between a Professional and SAFe Scrum Master
– YDS: Why Was Estimation Replaced by Sizing in Scrum Guide 2020?

 

 


Story Points are not the Problem, Velocity is

 

 

 


Scrum Requires Psychological Safety

 

 

 


Can ChatGPT teach you Scrum?

 

 

 


Product Owners, You do NOT Accept the Work in the Sprint Review

 

 

 


Improving Your Scrum with the Agile Kata (Part I)

 

 

 


PSPO Assessment Tips

 

 

 


French edition blog

Et si le Scrum Master n’était pas le facilitateur des événements ?

 

 

 


Italian edition blog

5 cambiamenti fondamentali

 

 

 


German edition blogs

– Die Begriffe Vision, Mission, Strategie und Roadmap verwirren dich? Eine verblüffend einfache Erklärung
– 3 Probleme, die durch die Definition of Ready entstehen

 

 

 Ein ChatGPT Jobinterview für eine Scrum-Master-Position
– Wie Sie ChatGPT für Ihr Scrum-Team erfolgreicher nutzen können

 

​​​​​​


Spanish edition blogs

Usos de Scrum

 

 

 

– Curso de Evidence-Based Management en Español
– Curso Evidence-Based Management #1 – ¿Qué es EBM?

 

 

– ¿La inteligencia artificial va a reemplazar a los agile coaches?
– ¿Qué es el gobierno ágil?

 

 


Learn More about Scrum.org Training and Certification

What Is The Scrum Framework?

What Is The Scrum Framework?

SCRUMptious Success: An Introduction to the Scrum Framework

Scrum is a framework for managing and completing complex projects. It was first introduced in the field of software development, but has since been applied to various industries such as construction, finance, and healthcare. The Scrum framework is based on Agile principles, which emphasize flexibility, adaptability, and continuous improvement.

The term “Scrum” was first coined in 1986 by Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka in their Harvard Business Review article “The New New Product Development Game.” The authors used the term to describe a rugby team’s ability to quickly and efficiently work together to achieve a common goal. This concept of a “Scrum” team, working together to achieve a common goal, is at the core of the Scrum framework.

The Scrum framework is designed to help teams work together more effectively and efficiently. It is a flexible and adaptive approach that allows teams to respond to changing requirements and unexpected obstacles. The Scrum framework is based on the following values: commitment, courage, focus, openness, and respect. These values are intended to guide the interactions and decisions of the Scrum team.

One of the main benefits of the Scrum framework is that it allows teams to deliver working product incrementally and regularly. This allows for continuous improvement and feedback, which ultimately leads to a better end product. Additionally, the Scrum framework encourages a high level of collaboration and communication between team members. This helps to ensure that everyone is on the same page, working towards the same goals and that any issues or obstacles are addressed quickly.

The Scrum framework is also designed to be highly adaptable to different types of projects and industries. It can be applied to both small and large projects and can be customized to fit the specific needs of a particular organization or team.

In summary, the Scrum framework is a flexible and adaptive approach for managing and completing complex projects. It is based on Agile principles and values and is designed to help teams work together more effectively and efficiently. The Scrum framework allows for continuous improvement and feedback and encourages a high level of collaboration and communication between team members. It can be applied to a wide range of industries and is highly adaptable to different types of projects. With the Scrum framework, teams can deliver working product incrementally and regularly, leading to better end-products.

The Scrum Superheroes: Understanding the Scrum Team Dynamic

One of the key elements of the Scrum framework is the Scrum team. The Scrum team is made up of individuals who work together to deliver a product incrementally and regularly. Each member of the Scrum team has specific roles and responsibilities, and it is important that these roles are clearly defined and understood by all team members.

The three main roles in a Scrum team are the Product Owner, the Scrum Master, and the Development Team.

The Product Owner is responsible for the product backlog, which is a prioritized list of items that need to be completed in order to deliver the final product. The Product Owner is responsible for communicating with stakeholders and customers to understand their needs and wants, and then prioritizing the product backlog accordingly. The Product Owner is also responsible for ensuring that the Development Team has a clear understanding of the requirements for each item in the product backlog.

The Scrum Master is responsible for facilitating the Scrum process and ensuring that the team is following the Scrum framework. The Scrum Master is responsible for removing any obstacles that may be preventing the team from meeting its goals. Additionally, the Scrum Master is responsible for protecting the team from external distractions and interruptions.

The Development Team is responsible for delivering a working product incrementally and regularly. The Development Team is made up of individuals who have the skills and knowledge necessary to deliver the product. The Development Team is self-organizing and is responsible for determining how to best deliver the product.

One of the key principles of Scrum is that the team should be self-organizing. This means that the team should be able to determine how best to deliver the product, without the need for external direction. This requires a high level of trust and communication within the team.

Effective communication and collaboration are essential for a Scrum team to function properly. The Scrum team should have regular meetings such as Sprint Planning, Daily Scrums, Sprint Review, and Sprint Retrospective to discuss progress and any issues that may have arisen. These meetings provide an opportunity for the team to communicate and collaborate in order to overcome any obstacles that may be preventing them from meeting their goals.

In addition to these meetings, it’s important for team members to communicate and collaborate throughout the entire process. This means that team members should be open and honest with one another, and should be willing to share their knowledge and expertise with others.

Effective communication and collaboration within the Scrum team can lead to a better end product, as well as a more efficient and enjoyable experience for team members. When team members trust and communicate with one another, they are better able to understand each other’s needs and to work together to overcome any obstacles that may arise.

In conclusion, the Scrum team is a key element of the Scrum framework and is made up of individuals with specific roles and responsibilities. The Scrum team functions and works together through effective communication and collaboration. The Product Owner, Scrum Master and Development Team have specific roles that helps the team to deliver a product incrementally and regularly. Effective communication and collaboration is important for a Scrum team to function properly and deliver a better end product.

The Scrum Machine: An Overview of the Scrum Process

The Scrum process is an essential part of the Scrum framework and is designed to help teams deliver a working product incrementally and regularly. The Scrum process is divided into four stages: Sprint Planning, Daily Scrums, Sprint Review, and Sprint Retrospective. Each stage plays a critical role in the product development process and it is important to understand how they all work together.

Sprint Planning is the first stage of the Scrum process. During Sprint Planning, the team meets to plan the work that will be completed during the upcoming Sprint. The Product Owner presents the highest priority items from the product backlog, and the Development Team decides how much work they can commit to completing during the Sprint. The team creates a Sprint backlog, which is a list of items from the product backlog that will be completed during the Sprint.

During the Daily Scrums, the team meets every day to discuss progress, identify any obstacles, and plan for the next 24 hours. Daily Scrums are time-boxed to 15 minutes, and the team is encouraged to be as efficient and productive as possible. The purpose of Daily Scrums is to ensure that everyone is on the same page and that any issues are addressed quickly.

The Sprint Review is held at the end of the Sprint. During the Sprint Review, the team demonstrates the working product increment to stakeholders and customers. The team also discusses what was completed during the Sprint, what was not completed, and why. The Sprint Review provides an opportunity for stakeholders and customers to provide feedback, and for the team to make adjustments to the product backlog.

The Sprint Retrospective is held after the Sprint Review. During the Sprint Retrospective, the team discusses what went well during the Sprint, what did not go well, and how things can be improved. The team also makes a plan for how to improve in the next Sprint. The Sprint Retrospective provides an opportunity for the team to reflect on the Sprint and make improvements for the next one.

Each stage of the Scrum process contributes to product development in its own way. Sprint Planning sets the direction for the Sprint, Daily Scrums ensure that the team is on track, Sprint Review provides feedback, and Sprint Retrospective provides an opportunity for improvement.

It’s important to note that Scrum is a process that’s built on continuous improvement. Reviewing and adjusting the process regularly is a key aspect of Scrum. Teams should be encouraged to experiment and make changes to the process as needed, in order to find what works best for them.

In conclusion, the Scrum process is an essential part of the Scrum framework. It’s divided into four stages: Sprint Planning, Daily Scrums, Sprint Review and Sprint Retrospective. Each stage plays a critical role in product development and contributes to the team’s ability to deliver a working product incrementally and regularly. Regular reviews and adjustments to the process are important in order to ensure continuous improvement and ensure that the process works best for the team.

The Scrum Treasure Chest: Understanding Scrum Artifacts

Scrum artifacts are tools that are used to track progress and guide decision-making within the Scrum framework. There are three main Scrum artifacts: the Product Backlog, the Sprint Backlog, and the Increment.

The Product Backlog is a prioritized list of items that need to be completed in order to deliver the final product. The Product Backlog is owned and maintained by the Product Owner, who is responsible for communicating with stakeholders and customers to understand their needs and wants, and then prioritizing the product backlog accordingly. The Product Backlog is a living document that is constantly updated to reflect the changing needs of the stakeholders and customers.

The Sprint Backlog is a list of items from the product backlog that will be completed during the upcoming Sprint. The Sprint Backlog is created during the Sprint Planning meeting and is owned and maintained by the Development Team. The Development Team is responsible for determining how much work they can commit to completing during the Sprint and for ensuring that the Sprint Backlog is up-to-date and accurate.

The Increment is the sum of all the Product Backlog items that have been completed during the Sprint and all previous Sprints. The Increment represents the working product at any given time and is used to demonstrate progress to stakeholders and customers during the Sprint Review.

Scrum artifacts are used to track progress and guide decision-making throughout the Scrum process. The Product Backlog is used to prioritize the work that needs to be done and to ensure that the team is working on the most important items first. The Sprint Backlog is used to track the progress of the team during the Sprint and to ensure that the team is on track to deliver a working product incrementally and regularly. The Increment is used to demonstrate progress to stakeholders and customers and to guide decision-making about what to work on next.

Managing Scrum artifacts is a key responsibility of the Scrum team. There are several best practices that can be used to ensure that the Scrum artifacts are managed effectively.

First, the Product Backlog should be reviewed and updated regularly. This ensures that the team is always working on the most important items and that the Product Backlog is up-to-date and accurate.

Second, the Sprint Backlog should be updated regularly and should be visible to everyone on the team. This ensures that everyone is aware of the team’s progress and can provide input and feedback as needed.

Third, the Increment should be demonstrated to stakeholders and customers regularly. This provides an opportunity for feedback and helps to ensure that the team is delivering a product that meets the needs of the stakeholders and customers.

In conclusion, Scrum artifacts are tools that are used to track progress and guide decision-making within the Scrum framework. There are three main Scrum artifacts: the Product Backlog, the Sprint Backlog, and the Increment. Each artifact plays a critical role in tracking progress and guiding decision-making throughout the Scrum process. Managing Scrum artifacts effectively is essential for ensuring that the team is delivering a working product incrementally and regularly. Best practices such as regularly reviewing and updating the Product Backlog, updating the Sprint Backlog regularly and making it visible to the team, and demonstrating the Increment regularly help the team to manage the artifacts effectively.

The Scrum Secret Weapons: A Guide to Scrum Tools and Techniques

Scrum tools and techniques are used to support the Scrum process and help teams to be more efficient and effective. Some of the most commonly used Scrum tools and techniques include burndown charts, user stories, and task boards.

Burndown charts are a simple but powerful tool that can be used to track progress during a Sprint. A burndown chart shows the amount of work remaining to be done over time, allowing the team to see at a glance how much work has been completed and how much remains to be done. This can be a valuable tool for identifying potential roadblocks and for making adjustments to the Sprint Backlog as needed.

User stories are a way to describe the requirements for a product in a simple, user-centered way. User stories are typically written in the format “As a [user], I want [functionality], so that [benefit].” User stories help to ensure that the team is focused on delivering a product that meets the needs of the stakeholders and customers.

Task boards are a visual tool that can be used to track the progress of individual tasks during a Sprint. Task boards can be physical or digital, and typically consist of columns for items that are “To Do,” “In Progress,” and “Done.” Task boards can be a valuable tool for ensuring that everyone on the team is aware of the progress of individual tasks and for identifying any obstacles that may be preventing tasks from being completed.

When using Scrum tools and techniques, it’s important to follow best practices in order to ensure that they are being used effectively.

One best practice is to make sure that all team members have a clear understanding of how each tool and technique is to be used and how it supports the Scrum process. This can be achieved through regular training and team meetings. Additionally, team members should be encouraged to ask questions and provide feedback on the tools and techniques being used.

Another best practice is to ensure that the tools and techniques are used consistently and correctly. For example, if burndown charts are being used to track progress, it’s important that the team is using the same format for the charts and that the data being entered is accurate. This helps to ensure that the charts are providing an accurate picture of progress and that any issues can be identified and addressed quickly.

It’s also important to ensure that the tools and techniques are being used regularly and at the appropriate times. For example, burndown charts should be updated daily during a Sprint, while user stories should be reviewed and updated regularly. This helps to ensure that the tools and techniques are providing accurate and up-to-date information to the team.

Finally, it’s important to continuously review and adjust the tools and techniques being used. This can be done by regularly reviewing the data generated by the tools and techniques and by soliciting feedback from team members. This helps to ensure that the tools and techniques are providing the information needed to support the Scrum process and that any issues are identified and addressed quickly.

In conclusion, Scrum tools and techniques are used to support the Scrum process and help teams to be more efficient and effective. Best practices for effectively using these tools and techniques include making sure that all team members have a clear understanding of how each tool and technique is to be used and how it supports the Scrum process, ensuring that the tools and techniques are used consistently and correctly, using the tools and techniques regularly and at the appropriate times and continuously reviewing and adjusting them. By following these best practices, teams can ensure that the tools and techniques are providing accurate and up-to-date information and that any issues are identified and addressed quickly.

Scrum on the Streets: Navigating the Challenges of Scrum Implementation

Scrum is a widely used framework for managing complex projects and is used by organizations of all sizes and in a variety of industries. Some real-world examples of organizations that have successfully implemented Scrum include Spotify, Amazon, and Google. Spotify, for example, uses Scrum to manage the development of its music streaming service. Amazon uses Scrum to manage the development of its e-commerce platform, and Google uses Scrum to manage the development of many of its products.

Despite its popularity and success, implementing Scrum can be challenging for organizations. One of the most common challenges is resistance to change. Scrum requires a shift in the way that work is done, and this can be difficult for some team members to accept. Another challenge is lack of understanding of the Scrum framework. Scrum requires a deep understanding of the roles, responsibilities, and processes involved in order to be successful.

Another challenge organizations face is a lack of clear ownership and accountability. In traditional project management, ownership and accountability are often clearly defined, whereas in Scrum, the roles and responsibilities of the team members are more fluid. This can lead to confusion and frustration, especially for team members who are used to working in a more traditional environment.

To overcome these challenges and make Scrum a success, organizations must take a strategic approach. One strategy is to start small. Organizations can begin by implementing Scrum on a single project, rather than trying to implement it across the entire organization all at once. This allows the team to gain experience and confidence with the framework before scaling up.

Another strategy is to provide training and education to all team members. This can help to ensure that everyone has a clear understanding of the Scrum framework and how it should be used. Additionally, organizations can provide coaching and mentoring to help team members adjust to the new way of working.

Scrum Wrap-up: S(cr)umming Up the Scrum Framework

In this article, we have explored the Scrum framework, including its definition, history, and purpose. We’ve also delved into the Scrum team, including roles and responsibilities, and how the team functions and works together. We’ve discussed the Scrum process and its four stages: Sprint Planning, Daily Scrums, Sprint Review, and Sprint Retrospective. We’ve also covered Scrum artifacts, including Product Backlog, Sprint Backlog, and Increment. Finally, we’ve covered Scrum tools and techniques and the best practices for effectively using them.

Scrum is a framework that provides a structured approach to managing complex projects, and it has become one of the most popular Agile methodologies. The Scrum process is designed to help teams deliver a working product incrementally and regularly. The Scrum artifacts are used to track progress and guide decision-making, while Scrum tools and techniques are used to support the process and help teams to be more efficient and effective.

The importance of Scrum framework in Agile software development cannot be overstated. Scrum provides a framework that allows teams to be flexible, responsive, and adaptive to change, which is essential in today’s fast-paced business environment. Scrum also provides a way for teams to work together effectively, which is essential for delivering a working product incrementally and regularly.

In conclusion, this article has provided an overview of the Scrum framework and its key components. It’s important to note that Scrum is a process that’s built on continuous improvement. Teams should be encouraged to experiment and make changes to the process as needed, in order to find what works best for them. We encourage you to consider using the Scrum framework in your upcoming projects and to take the time to understand the framework, its key components, and best practices for effectively using it. With the right approach, Scrum can help you deliver a working product incrementally and regularly, and manage complex projects more effectively.

What Is The Scrum Methodology?

What Is The Scrum Methodology?

Are you looking to learn more about the Scrum methodology? Scrum is a widely used agile project management framework that is used to help teams reach their goals. This article will provide an overview of what Scrum is and why it has become so popular. It will discuss the basic elements of the Scrum methodology, its benefits, and common implementation challenges. With this information, you’ll have a better understanding of how your team can use the Scrum methodology to achieve success.

What is Scrum?

Are you curious about what Scrum is? Do you want to know how this agile methodology can help your organization reach its goals? Then read on!

Scrum is an iterative and incremental agile methodology that helps teams produce products in complex, rapidly changing environments. This method allows teams to prioritize tasks, plan timelines, and deliver results on time by breaking down projects into smaller cycles of work. It’s based on the premise of using a “sprint” or short period of time (typically two weeks) to complete a project. During each sprint, the team will plan, execute and review their progress before moving onto the next sprint.

By using Scrum, teams are able to adjust quickly to changes in project specifications without sacrificing quality or timelines. Furthermore, it encourages collaboration among team members and allows them to focus their efforts on completing necessary tasks efficiently.

Core Principles of Scrum

Scrum is an agile methodology that has revolutionized the way teams work and collaborate on projects. It’s a framework designed to help teams self-organize and tap into their collective wisdom in order to deliver high-quality results. The core principles of Scrum are designed to foster collaboration, communication, responsibility, and ownership within a team.

At the heart of Scrum lies three simple yet powerful principles: transparency, inspection, and adaptation. Transparency means that all stakeholders have visibility into what’s going on throughout the project timeline; inspection allows for real-time monitoring and assessment of progress; finally, adaptation encourages teams to continually adjust their methods as needed in order to ensure success. With these principles at its core, Scrum enables teams to successfully complete complex projects quickly and efficiently while creating a culture of continuous improvement along the way.

The Origins of Scrum

The Scrum methodology has been revolutionizing the way teams develop and deliver high-quality products for over 25 years now. This agile framework was created to better manage complex projects, while focusing on customer satisfaction and continuous improvement. It is a powerful tool that helps teams reach their goals faster than ever before.

Scrum began in 1993 when Jeff Sutherland and Ken Schwaber first introduced the framework at an Object-Oriented Programming conference in Austin, TX. At first, Scrum was limited to software development, but it has since evolved, becoming adopted by companies of all sizes around the world. This revolutionary method can be used across industries from IT to marketing and even finance!

Thanks to its many advantages over traditional project management models, Scrum is now one of the most popular frameworks for driving company success.

Main Components of Scrum

Are you looking to understand the main components of the popular scrum methodology? Then look no further! Scrum is a widely used agile project management system that many organizations have adopted in recent years. It helps teams quickly and efficiently tackle projects, allowing for quick changes if needed and greater accountability through team collaboration.

So what are the main components of scrum? There are three primary components to this approach – sprints, standups and retrospectives. Sprints are short cycles during which tasks are completed; standups involve daily check-ins with the team; and retrospectives allow for reflection on what went well or not so well at the end of each sprint. These three components come together to create an efficient system that allows for quick adaptation when needed, enabling teams to get projects done on time with minimum hassle.

Photo by Lala Azizli on Unsplash

Roles in Scrum

Scrum is an Agile methodology that has the potential to revolutionize a team’s productivity. It is a framework for managing complex projects, where teams work together to deliver value-driven results in short sprints. Although the concept of Scrum involves all members of a team, there are three main roles that form the basis of any successful scrum project: Product Owner, Scrum Master, and Development Team.

The Product Owner

Are you looking to join the world of agile? Then you’re likely familiar with scrum methodology, and if so you’ve probably heard about the role of the product owner. The product owner is an essential part of any scrum team, leading the development from concept to delivery.

The product owner is responsible for maximizing value in the development process. They must be able to strategically prioritize tasks and create a roadmap that will bring the product to life. Product owners need good communication skills as they are expected to keep stakeholders informed on progress while managing customer feedback and expectations.

Product owners are also responsible for defining user stories and ensuring that developers understand their importance. They should have a deep understanding of market trends, customer needs, and technology capabilities as these all factor into successful delivery within a scrum framework.

The Scrum Master

Scrum is a project management methodology used to organize and manage complex projects. It has become an incredibly popular tool for modern businesses looking to increase productivity and streamline their operations. And the Scrum Master is an essential role in any Agile team.

The Scrum Master acts as a facilitator, guide and coach for the team. Their main role is to ensure that Agile principles are respected and implemented properly within the organization. They work with everyone from developers to product owners, helping them stay focused on delivering successful outcomes within specific timelines. The Scrum Master also provides guidance on how best to use Scrum methodology throughout each project, ensuring that processes are followed correctly so that goals can be met efficiently and effectively.

The Development Team

Are you curious about the role of the development team in a software engineering project? The development team is an integral part of a project’s success. They are responsible for bringing ideas to life and ensuring that projects are completed on time and within budget. With the rise of agile methodology, development teams have become even more important for successful software engineering projects.

The development team is usually comprised of various roles such as developers, testers, product owners, and scrum masters. All these roles work together to create a cohesive unit that understands their individual roles and works collaboratively towards meeting common goals. Scrum methodology is often used by teams to ensure that deadlines are met and tasks are completed efficiently. This allows the team members to focus on their specific tasks while having the assurance that everyone else on the team is also doing their part.

Benefits of the Scrum Methodology

The Scrum methodology has been gaining a lot of traction in the project management world for its unique approach to completing projects. Agile development processes have allowed teams to create products quickly and efficiently, and this is where the Scrum methodology shines.

This agile method looks at breaking down big projects into smaller pieces or sprints, allowing teams to evaluate their progress faster and adjust as needed. With shorter feedback loops, teams are able to take advantage of quicker iterations and make better decisions about the product’s direction. This not only saves time but also allows for mistakes to be caught early on in development which reduces overall costs.

The Scrum methodology can be beneficial in any organization that needs an efficient way of completing projects with success.

Challenges with Implementing Scrum

Scrum is an agile project management methodology that has revolutionized the way teams work together. It encourages greater collaboration, communication and flexibility in the workplace. Implementing a new process can be difficult for any team, but with Scrum it doesn’t have to be! The challenges of transitioning to Scrum are worth the effort, as teams will reap the rewards of increased productivity and improved morale.

Making the change from traditional methods to Scrum requires careful planning and implementation. It’s essential for teams to understand each step of the scrum process before beginning their journey. This includes forming their scrum team, assigning roles and responsibilities, setting up sprints and reviews, as well as understanding all relevant terminology such as “scrum master” or “product owner”. All these steps need to be taken into consideration when attempting to implement Scrum successfully.

Conclusion: Switching to Scrum from Waterfall

Scrum focuses on delivering results quickly and efficiently, with an emphasis on customer feedback throughout the whole process. Unlike traditional waterfall development techniques, scrum teams work in short cycles called sprints that can adapt quickly to changing needs and demands. Each iteration provides immediate value by releasing features and updates as soon as they are ready. As a result, teams can focus on what works without getting bogged down in long timelines or perfectionism.

The benefits of scrum are numerous – from improved team communication and collaboration to enhanced creativity and productivity.

Upcoming Scrum Webcasts As Of December 20th, 2022

Upcoming Scrum Webcasts As Of December 20th, 2022

In today’s world of ever-evolving technology, it is essential to stay up to date with the latest industry trends and best practices. Scrum is one of the leading agile frameworks used by organizations around the globe to increase productivity, reduce costs, and optimize operations. Watching webcasts about scrum can be a great way for professionals to gain knowledge on this topic and further their education.

Webcasts offer users a wealth of information in a convenient format that can be accessed from anywhere in the world. By watching these webcasts, users can learn more about different aspects of scrum, such as its principles, methodology, techniques, tools, and resources. Additionally, many webcast providers offer interactive sessions which allow viewers to ask questions directly from experts and get answers quickly during live streams or recorded videos.

 

Upcoming Webcasts

At Scrum.org, we have two webcast series that can help you continue your learning. ScrumPulse is an educational webcast series designed to help those new to Scrum and those with experience learn and improve. We also offer an Ask a Professional Scrum Trainer series, which is a live interactive session where you can bring your toughest Scrum questions and challenges! Below is the listing of the webcasts we have coming up soon!

Wednesday
January 17
10:00 AM EST
(15:00 UTC)

(Spanish) Pregúntale a un PST: ¿Cómo se valida el trabajo en Scrum?
El Product Owner es responsable de gestionar el Product Backlog, que incluye la comunicación clara de los Ítems, pero no se dice en ningún lugar de la Guía Scrum que sea responsable también de aceptarlos. En esta sesión Alex Ballarín, Professional Scrum Trainer, te solucionará como:¿Es el Sprint Review el lugar donde se acepta el trabajo?¿Acepta el Product Owner el trabajo de los desarrolladores? y mas!
Learn more
Wednesday
January 18
11:00 AM EST
(16:00 UTC)

Tips to Overcome Agile Skepticism
The idea of self-managing teams who have flexible scope and timelines can be perceived as daunting to some executives and senior leaders. In this session, Professional Scrum Trainer, Mary Iqbal will talk about some of the common misconceptions about Scrum and Agile in general from a leader’s perspective and how to overcome them. Learn more
Tuesday
January 31
11:00 AM EST
(16:00 UTC)

10 Tips to Enable Self-Managing Teams
In this webinar, Professional Scrum Trainer Ravi Verma shares a play from his Scrum Adoption Playbook – the Scrum Team Quick-Launch or Reboot. He shares the 10 common barriers to the emergence of self-managing Scrum Teams and the 10 practices we use to help Scrum Teams break-through these barriers. Learn more
Wednesday
February 8
10:00 AM EST
(15:00 UTC)

How to Improve Communication and Collaboration Between Developers and Scrum Masters
Scrum is a tool that helps people, teams and organizations generate value through adaptive solutions to complex problems. In this Scrum Pulse, PSTs Joanna Plaskonka and Magdalena Kucharska will talk about these misconceptions and consider what you can do to make working with Scrum Master better and more effective through communication. Learn more
Tuesday
February 14
11:00 AM EST
(16:00 UTC)

Ask a Professional Scrum Trainer with Sander Dur
In this live session of Ask a Professional Scrum Trainer, Sander Dur will be available to answer your burning questions about Scrum and the challenges you or your teams have. Learn more
Scrum Classes Coming As Of December 12th, 2022

Scrum Classes Coming As Of December 12th, 2022

Are you looking for an exciting way to take your career to the next level? New scrum classes are a great way to do just that! Scrum is a project management framework used by successful teams all over the world, and taking classes can help you become an expert in this popular system.

Scrum classes provide several benefits that could be extremely helpful for any individual or team looking to improve their workflow. You’ll learn about the core principles of scrum, including its time-boxed iterations and cross-functional collaboration. With these new skills, you can develop strategies for solving complex challenges and managing unpredictable change. Plus, learning from experienced professionals will give you valuable insight into how others have successfully implemented scrum within their own organizations. Armed with that knowledge, you’ll be able to apply it directly into your own work environment.


19-Dec  –  20-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Rich Visotcky


19-Dec  –  20-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Jason Malmstadt


05-Jan  –  06-Jan
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Jason Malmstadt


05-Jan  –  06-Jan
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by John Riley


16-Jan  –  17-Jan
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Jason Malmstadt

Professional Scrum Master Training Banner
17-Dec  –  18-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/Los Angeles from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Andreanna Marshall


17-Dec  –  18-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/Chicago from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by GSM Scott Adams


19-Dec  –  20-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/Los Angeles from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Robert Pieper


19-Dec  –  21-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 12:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Taught by Chris Belknap


19-Dec  –  20-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Chuck Suscheck

Professional Scrum Master II Banner
23-Jan  –  24-Jan
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Gregory Crown


26-Jan  –  27-Jan
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 4:30 PM
Taught by Todd Miller and Ryan Ripley


30-Jan  –  02-Feb
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 12:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Taught by Artsem Lashchonau


30-Jan  –  02-Feb
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 10:00 AM – 2:30 PM
Taught by Ashish Mehra


07-Feb  –  09-Feb
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 12:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Taught by Chris Belknap

Professional Scrum Product Owner Training
19-Dec  –  20-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Gregory Crown


22-Dec  –  23-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/Los Angeles from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Robert Pieper


28-Dec  –  29-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Chuck Suscheck


09-Jan  –  12-Jan
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Taught by Chris Conlin and Jim Sammons


09-Jan  –  10-Jan
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Chuck Suscheck


09-Jan  –  10-Jan
Live Virtual Class from America/Los Angeles from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Gregory Crown​​​​​​

Professional Scrum Product Owner Advanced Training

15-Dec  –  16-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/Chicago from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Chad Beier and Jeff Bubolz

Professional Scrum Developer Training
01-Feb  –  03-Feb
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by John Riley

Scaled Professional Scrum Training

06-Mar  –  07-Mar
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Chuck Suscheck


14-Mar  –  15-Mar
Live Virtual Class from America/Chicago from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Michael Wallace

Professional Agile Leadership Essentials Training

22-Dec  –  23-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Gregory Crown


09-Jan  –  12-Jan
Live Virtual Class from America/Chicago from 12:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Taught by Mary Iqbal


19-Jan  –  20-Jan
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Gregory Crown


16-Feb  –  17-Feb
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Gregory Crown


13-Mar  –  16-Mar
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Taught by Mark Wavle
​​​​​​

16-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Todd Miller and Ryan Ripley


10-Feb
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Todd Miller and Ryan Ripley


02-Mar  –  03-Mar
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 12:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Taught by Stephanie Ockerman


09-Mar
Live Virtual Class from America/Chicago from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Michael Wallace and Blake McMillan​​​​​​

Professional Scrum with Kanban Training
15-Dec  –  16-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by John Riley


19-Dec  –  20-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/Indiana/Indianapolis from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Eric Landes


13-Feb  –  16-Feb
Live Virtual Class from America/Chicago from 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Taught by Mary Iqbal and Andy Hiles


13-Feb  –  14-Feb
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by John Riley


16-Feb  –  17-Feb
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Todd Miller and Ryan Ripley and Daniel Vacanti

Professional Scrum with User Experience Training
05-Jan  –  06-Jan
Live Virtual Class from America/Chicago from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Chad Beier and Jeff Bubolz


07-Feb  –  08-Feb
Live Virtual Class from America/Chicago from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Ty Crockett


​​​​​

Professional Scrum Facilitation Skills Banner
15-Dec  –  16-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 12:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Taught by Chris Belknap


15-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/Chicago from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Michael Wallace and Blake McMillan


19-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/Chicago from 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Taught by Jeff Lee


29-Dec
Live Virtual Class from America/New York from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Taught by Rich Visotcky


19-Jan
In Person Class in Miami
Taught by Jeff Lee